Annual Davis Lecture in Christianity presents Anticommunist Supplements: Christianity and Politics in South Korea

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September 26, 2019
4:30PM - 6:00PM
Location
Thompson Library 165

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2019-09-26 16:30:00 2019-09-26 18:00:00 Annual Davis Lecture in Christianity presents Anticommunist Supplements: Christianity and Politics in South Korea

Angie Heo is Assistant Professor of the Anthropology and Sociology of Religion at the University of Chicago Divinity School. 

Since the 1980s and 1990s at least, Evangelical Christianity's fabled explosion in South Korea has stoked curiosity in the various factors that precipitate mass conversion and moral conservatism worldwide.  In this lecture, Heo addresses one key element of Protestantism's resolute grip in South Korea: anticommunism and the perpetual state of war across the divided Koreas.  From development to democratization, "anticommunism" has accrued multiple meanings and effects that have served Christianity's hegemonic place in Korean society and politics.  Beyond questions specific to Korea, this talk also considers critical approaches to postcolonial mission history and Cold War capitalism for scholars of Christianity in the non-West.   

Thompson Library 165 Department of Comparative Studies compstudies@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

Angie Heo is Assistant Professor of the Anthropology and Sociology of Religion at the University of Chicago Divinity School. 

Since the 1980s and 1990s at least, Evangelical Christianity's fabled explosion in South Korea has stoked curiosity in the various factors that precipitate mass conversion and moral conservatism worldwide.  In this lecture, Heo addresses one key element of Protestantism's resolute grip in South Korea: anticommunism and the perpetual state of war across the divided Koreas.  From development to democratization, "anticommunism" has accrued multiple meanings and effects that have served Christianity's hegemonic place in Korean society and politics.  Beyond questions specific to Korea, this talk also considers critical approaches to postcolonial mission history and Cold War capitalism for scholars of Christianity in the non-West.