Autumn 2017 Undergraduate Courses

Comparative Studies

Comparative Studies 1100 Introduction to the Humanities: Cross-Cultural Perspectives

Multiple Sections

Explores the role of literature and the arts in constructing, maintaining, and questioning the values and beliefs of diverse cultures and historical periods; topics vary.  GE Literature and Diversity: Global Studies. Honors version.

*Other sections of 1100 can be found on buckeye link

Comparative Studies 2099 Questions in Comparative Studies

Mo 5:20PM – 6:15PM | Hagerty Hall 451| David Horn      

This course offers an introduction to the Comparative Studies major. It is designed to help students to take advantage of curricular, research, and advising opportunities; to manage the particular challenges of independent and interdisciplinary work; to link classroom work to social and political engagement with relevant communities; and to prepare for life after graduation.  This course is graded S/U.

Comparative Studies 2101 Literature and Society

TuTh 2:20PM - 3:40PM | University Hall 038 | Vidar Thorsteinsson

Through readings, films, and extensive class discussion, the course explores the relationship between literature and society. Organized around five novels and five accompanying films, students will read texts from different regions of the world and cultural contexts, addressing their social implications and political conditions. Class discussions will turn on questions of social critique, representations of culture and community, and discourses of social relation and justice. Prereq: Honors standing, and English 1110 (110) or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 2101 (201, 201H). GE lit and diversity global studies

Comparative Studies 2103 Literature and the Self

TuTh 3:55PM - 5:15PM | Campbell Hall 209 | Lucia Bortoli

Study of relationships between psychology and literature; analysis of psychological concepts and processes as represented in literature and film of diverse cultures and historical periods. GE Literature and Diversity: Global Studies

Comparative Studies 2104 Literature, Science, and Technology

TuTh 11:10AM - 12:30PM | Campbell Hall 213 | Eugene Holland

Study of relationships among literature, science, and technology; analysis of representations of science and technology in literature and film of diverse cultures and historical periods.
Prereq: English 1110 (110) or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 2104H (204H) or 204. GE lit and diversity global studies course.

Comparative Studies 2104H Literature, Science, and Technology

TuTh 2:20PM - 3:40PM | Enarson Classroom Bldg 312 | Eugene Holland

Study of relationships among literature, science, and technology; analysis of representations of science and technology in literature and film of diverse cultures and historical periods.
Prereq: English 1110 (110) or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 2104H (204H) or 204. GE lit and diversity global studies course.

Comparative Studies 2105 Literature and Ethnicity

WeFr 12:45PM - 2:05PM | Caldwell Lab 137 | Staff

Study of relationships between literature and ethnicity; analysis of concepts of ethnicity as represented in literature and film of diverse cultures and historical periods. GE Literature and Diversity: Social Diversity in the U.S.

Comparative Studies 2214 Introduction to Sexuality Studies

TuTh 2:20PM - 3:40PM | 140 W 19th 205 | Noah Tamarkin

This course provides an introduction to sexuality studies through an interdisciplinary approach, examining a range of sexual and gender diversity, primarily in the U.S. We will discuss a variety of ways in which gender and sexuality are constructed, performed, experienced and written about. This course serves as the introductory course to the Sexuality Studies Major, and is highly recommended for the Sexuality Studies Minor. Cross-listed in EduPAES.

Comparative Studies 2264 Introduction to Popular Culture Studies

Multiple Sections

Introduction to the analysis of popular culture texts, with special emphasis on the relationship between popular culture studies and literary studies. Cross-listed in English. GE Cultures and Ideas.

*Other sections of 2264 can be found on buckeye link

Comparative Studies 2281 American Icons

TuTh 3:55PM - 5:15PM | Enarson Classroom Bldg 222 | Matt Brenn

Interdisciplinary methods in American studies; emphasis on the plurality of identities in American culture. GE Cultures and Ideas and Diversity: Social Diversity in the US.

Comparative Studies 2301 Introduction to World Literature

TuTh 11:10AM - 12:30PM | Arps Hall 388   | Ashley Perez

What is “world literature”? Is it the “best of the best” of all the national literatures in the world? Works that people everywhere claim as their cultural inheritance? Is it what we call any literary work once it travels beyond the context in which it was originally written? Does world literature enrich our lives through cultural exchange? And what about the realities of writers in many parts of the world who can only access a significant audience by writing in English or producing works that “travel well” via translation?

We will tackle these questions through our discussion of literatures of the world in their historical and social contexts. We will read twentieth-century texts from the literary traditions of five geopolitical areas: the Middle East; Africa; Asia; Latin and Central America/the Caribbean; and Europe/North America. Student presentations will introduce additional examples of literary texts from different time periods.

In addition to engaged in-class and online discussion, course assignments include short papers and a presentation. All assignments will help you pursue the course goals and participate deeply in a community of learners.

This course meets GE requirements in Literature and Diversity (Global Studies).

Comparative Studies 2322 Introduction to Latino Studies

TuTh 3:55PM - 5:15PM | Caldwell Lab120 | Theresa Delgadillo

This course provides an introduction to Latina/o Studies for those interested in learning more about the national, racial, social, and economic diversity of Latinas/os; key issues facing Latinas/os; and important topics and methods in the study of Latinas/os. Students will gain an overview of the historical and cultural experience of Latinas/os from the 19th century forward and study specific political, social, and cultural events of relevance to Latinas/os. Some of the questions we will explore include: What defines, unites or divides Latinas/os? How have Latinas/os been viewed in the U.S.? What important political movements have enjoyed Latina/o leadership or participation? What is the significance of sexuality, gender, race, and class among Latinas/os? What kinds of literature and art have Latinas/os created? How pervasive is Latina/o influence in popular culture? How do Latinas/os fit into the U.S. mosaic?  Surveying the historical and current efforts of Latinas/os in the legal, religious, political, literary and artistic arenas will allow students to better understand and appreciate the visions of this American community.

Comparative Studies 2340 Introduction to Cultures of Science and Technology

TuTh 11:10AM - 12:30PM | Mendenhall Lab 125 | Noah Tamarkin

This class provides an introduction to the field of Science & Technology Studies. Science & Technology Studies, often referred to as STS, is an interdisciplinary field that examines how science and technology are shaped by and shape culture and society. STS brings the sciences, social sciences, and humanities together by asking questions such as: How do we know what we know? What do we mean when we talk about things like facts, objectivity, and scientific methods? How do historical and social contexts shape the production of science, and how does science in turn shape our world, our experiences, and our relationships? As we address these questions, we will familiarize ourselves with critical thought about science and technology, including key historical, sociological, and anthropological theories and case studies. We will learn to think critically about how scientific practice claims access to truth, reason, and universality. Together, we will hone our analytical skills by discussing a broad range of contemporary issues in which scientific knowledge and technological capacity are entwined with the power relations of race, sex, global capitalism, and politics. This course is an experiment in collective knowledge production in which we will all participate, and throughout the course, we will follow the ideas of knowledge, culture, and experimental worlds. These themes organize the course into two units: 1. ways of knowing: science as culture and cultures of science and technology; and 2. Experimental worlds.

Comparative Studies 2341 Technology, Science, and Society

TuTh 9:10AM - 10:05AM | Scott Lab E001 | Monamie Haines

Multiple Recitation Sections

This course explores, from a variety of perspectives, the multiple relations among social and cultural formations, scientific and technical work, and the production and circulation of knowledge.  Topics include the everyday life of the laboratory, the shifting boundaries of science and other ways of knowing, the political and ethical contours of scientific and technical work, and the social effects of scientific discourses and technological systems. This class fulfills the GE Cultures and Ideas and Diversity (Global Studies) requirements and the Professional Ethics requirement for the College of Engineering.

Comparative Studies 2350 Introduction to Folklore

TuTh 11:10AM - 12:30PM | Denny Hall 253 | Katherine Borland 

A general study of the field of folklore including basic approaches and a survey of primary folk materials: folktales, legends, folksongs, ballads, and folk beliefs. Prereq: English 1110 (110) or equiv. Not open to students with credit for English 2270 (270), or 2350H. GE cultures and ideas course. Cross-listed in English 2270. 

Comparative Studies 2360 Introduction to Comparative Cultural Studies

WeFr 12:45AM - 2:05PM | McPherson Lab 1040 | Miranda Martinez

Introduction to interdisciplinary field of cultural studies; emphasis on relation of cultural production to power, knowledge, and authority, globally and locally.Prereq: English 1110 (110) or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 274. GE cultures and ideas course.

Comparative Studies 2367.04 Science and Technology in American Culture

Multiple Sections

Role of science and technology in contemporary American society; their relationship to human values; sources of concern about their impact; evaluation of selected issues. GE Writing and Communication: Level 2 and Cultures and Ideas and Diversity: Social Diversity in the US. Honors version.
*Other sections of 2367.04 can be found on buckeye link

Comparative Studies 2367.07 Religious Diversity in the U.S.

Multiple Sections

Exploration of the concept of religious freedom and the position of minority religious groups in American society. GE Writing and Communication: Level 2 and Cultures and Ideas and Diversity: Social Diversity in the US.
*Other sections of 2367.07 can be found on buckeye link

Comparative Studies 2367.08 American Identity in the World

Multiple Sections

American culture viewed from inside and from the perspective of foreign cultures, as seen in literature, film, art, music, journalism, folklore, and popular culture. GE Writing and Communication: Level 2 and Cultures and Ideas and Diversity: Social Diversity in the US. Honors version.
*Other sections of 2367.08 can be found on buckeye link

Comparative Studies 2864H Modernity and Postmodernity: Issues and Ideas

TuTh 12:45PM - 2:05PM | Enarson Classroom Bldg 312 | Philip Armstrong

Examination of some of the defining ideas of modern thought and how those ideas have problematically affected modern life in both developed and developing countries. Prereq: Honors standing and English 1110 (110) or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 240H or 240. GE lit and diversity global studies course.

Comparative Studies 3302 Translating Literatures and Cultures 

TuTh PM 9:35AM - 10:55AM | Caldwell Lab 109 | Gregory Jusdanis

Introduction to issues and problems inherent to translating literatures and cultures. Prereq: English 1110 (110), or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 3302E (373E) or 373. GE cultures and ideas and diversity global studies course.

Comparative Studies 3302E Translating Literatures and Cultures 

TuTh PM 9:35AM - 10:55AM | Caldwell Lab 109 | Gregory Jusdanis

Introduction to issues and problems inherent to translating literatures and cultures. Prereq: English 1110 (110), or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 3302E (373E) or 373. GE cultures and ideas and diversity global studies course.

Comparative Studies 3360 Introduction to Globalization and Culture

WeFr 11:10AM - 12:30PM | Mendenhall Lab 125 | Nancy Jesser

History and contemporary dimensions of globalization, focusing on period preceding European hegemony, era of European colonialism, period of decolonization, and contemporary contexts. Prereq: Soph standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 357.

Comparative Studies 3603 Love in World Literature

Multiple Sections

This course explores diverse formulations, presentations, and engagements with love in fiction, poetry, and visual forms. Underlying nearly every story of human relationships is a particular concept of what love is, and we will seek to articulate this idea, understand its complexity, and compare it to other conceptions in other texts. Through our explorations of literature, we will consider what makes love particular or universal to people and cultures, the extent to which love is described as spiritual as compared to animal, and the extent to which love reflects individual needs and drives or, alternatively, how it develops in response to community and tradition. We will also consider the influence of various notions (e.g., affection, friendship, attraction, sexuality, duty, kinship, community, religion, patriotism, power, and commodities) on how we—and the texts we read—construct love. This course requires engaged participation and demonstrated preparation and will engage students in a range of structures for discussion and collaboration. Assignments include several short response papers, an in-class analysis presentation, and a final course portfolio. GE Literature and Diversity: Global Studies.
*Other sections of 3603 can be found on buckeye link

Comparative Studies 3606 The Quest in World Literature

TuTh 9:35AM – 10:55AM | Campbell Hall 309 | Daniel Reff

Motif of the quest in world literature; physical and mental journeys as metaphors of personal transformation and salvation. GE Literature and Diversity: Global Studies.

Comparative Studies 3607 Film and Literature as Narrative Art

Multiple Sections

Relationships between film and literature; emergence of cinematic art as a form of representation with emphasis on diverse cultural traditions. GE Visual and Performing Arts and Diversity: Global Studies. Honors version.

Comparative Studies 3608 Representations of the Experience of War

Multiple Sections

Representations of war in works of literature, religious texts, and film from diverse cultures and time periods. GE Literature and Diversity: Global Studies.

Comparative Studies 3645 Cultures of Medicine

TuTh 12:45PM - 2:05PM | Hagerty Hall 052 | David Horn

This interdisciplinary course explores medical arts and sciences, concepts of illness and disease, and representations of the human body in a range of cultural and historical contexts.  Topics include metaphors and images of the body, the meanings and symbolism constructed around pathology (cancer, depression, eating disorders, AIDS), the cultural construction of death, the social consequences of “medicalizing” racial and sexual differences, and the concerns raised by recent medical technologies.

This class fulfills the GE Cultures and Ideas and Diversity (Global Studies) requirements, and satisfies the foundation course requirement for the new Minor in Medical Humanities

Comparative Studies 3646 Cultures, Natures, Technologies

TuTh 12:25PM - 2:05PM | Campbell Hall 213 | Bernhard Malkmus 

Cultural perspectives on issues related to technology, nature, and culture; examines cultural approaches to uses of technology and their relation to natural and human worlds. Prereq: English 1110 (110), or equiv. GE cultures and ideas course.

Comparative Studies 3686 Cultural Studies of American Musics

TuTh 12:45PM – 2:05PM | Mendenhall Lab 115 | Barry Shank

Investigation of the social, political, and cultural contexts of the development of popular musics in the U.S. GE Visual and Performing Arts and Diversity: Social Diversity in the US.

Comparative Studies 3990 Approaches to Comparative Studies

TuTh 2:20PM – 3:40PM | Enarson Clasroom Bldg 304 | Katherine Borland

Introduces comparative studies majors to theoretical tools, methods of investigation, and key concepts in comparative studies research and scholarship. Prereq: English 1110 (110) or equiv. CompStd major, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 398.

Comparative Studies 4597.01 Global Studies of Science and Technology

WeFr 9:10-10:30 | Knowlton 195  | Katie Hendy

While the West is often portrayed as the origin of scientific and technological progress, this course will attempt to destabilize this narrative by asking critical questions about how techno-science takes shape and circulates in a global context.
While techno-science often purports to produce universal arti/facts that can travel to any location, this class instead calls attention to the grounded histories, local politics and cultures in which techno-scientific projects are formed. In dong so, the course will question how the “global” itself becomes an object of study? How do post/colonial legacies shape the production and circulation of new technologies and experiments? By what mechanisms do facts and technologies circulate on a global scale?   This course will approach these theoretical conversations through grounded engagement with contemporary issues: how do the politics of climate science both draw upon and challenge the dichotomy of the global and local? How do citizen science projects challenge the boundaries of institutional science? What happens to understandings of life and ethics when pharmaceuticals and biotechnologies circulate through market logics? 
 

Comparative Studies 4803 Studies in Asian American Literature and Culture

WeFr 2:20PM-3:40PM | Jennings Hall 136 | Martin Ponce

Focused study of a topic in Asian American literary and cultural studies. Prereq: English 1110 (110), or equiv. Not open to students with 10 qtr cr hrs in 543 or English 587 or with 6 sem cr hrs in English 4587. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs. Cross-listed in English 4587.

Comparative Studies 4804 Studies in Latino Literature and Culture 

TuTh 12:45PM-2:05PM | Hagerty Hall 046 | Theresa Delgadillo

Focused study of a topic in Latino/a literary and cultural studies. Prereq: English 1110 (110), or equiv. Not open to students with 10 qtr cr hrs in 544 or 588 or 6 sem cr hrs in English 4588. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs. Cross-listed in English 4588.

Comparative Studies 4921 Intersections: Approaches to Race, Gender, Class, and Sexuality 

WeFr 9:35AM-10:55AM | Journalism Bldg 304 | Maurice Stevens

Examines intersections of race, gender, class, and sexuality in various sites within American culture (e.g., legal system, civil rights discourse, social justice movements). Prereq: One course in CompStd, WGSSt, or AfAmASt. Not open to students with credit for 545, AfAmAst 4921 (545), or WGSSt 4921 (545). Cross-listed in AfAmASt and WGSSt.

Comparative Studies 4998 Undergraduate Research in Comparative Studies

Multiple Sections

 Undergraduate research in variable topics; independent study. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs or 3 completions. This course is graded S/U.

Comparative Studies 4998H Undergraduate Research in Comparative Studies

TBA | TBA | Eugene Holland

Undergraduate research in variable topics; independent study. Prereq: Honors standing, and permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs or 3 completions. This course is graded S/U.

Comparative Studies 4999 Undergraduate Thesis

Multiple Sections

Independent study for 4th-year students wishing to complete a senior thesis. Prereq: Sr standing, and permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs or 2 completions. This course is graded S/U.

Comparative Studies 4999H Honors Thesis

Multiple Sections

Independent study for 4th-year students wishing to complete a senior thesis. Prereq: Sr standing, and permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs or 2 completions. This course is graded S/U.

Comparative Studies 5980 Ancient and Modern Narrative: Cognition, Affect, Ethics, Belief

TBA | TBA | Staff

 This course will juxtapose narratives from an ancient culture with narratives from a modern culture to explore the hypothesis that the power of narrative arises from its capacity to affect the lives of audiences by engaging their cognition, affect, ethics, and beliefs. Team-taught w/ faculty in English. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for English 5980. Cross-listed in English.

Religious Studies

Religious Studies

Religious Studies 2102.01 Literature and Religion

 WeFr 12:45PM-2:05PM | McPherson Lab 1035 | Daniel Reff

Many of us think of religion, or religious texts and rituals, as meaningful because they convey transcendent truths (i.e. “love thy neighbor;” “this too will pass”).  And yet all religions necessarily reflect the particular cultural-historical context in which they emerge and evolve.  For instance, the life and teachings of Jesus Christ as conveyed in the New Testament are not fully intelligible or meaningful without reference to the Roman Empire of the first century C.E.  However much we may think of religion as transcendent “truths,”  religious experience or “religion” is necessarily a matter of time and place. In this class we will consider religious text and experience in the context of empire, or what today we might refer to as “globalization” (when the vagaries of life are governed by forces beyond the local).  We will read a variety of texts, including works that are considered “classics” of literature (e.g. Silence, by Shusaku Endo, House Made of Dawn, by N. Scott Momaday, and My Name is Red, by Orhan Pamuk, Matagari by Ngugi wa Thiongo).  Each of these works explore how individuals from different religious traditions (e.g. Native American, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism) struggle to make sense of their lives in the context of empire.

Evaluation:

There is no midterm or final exam and no term paper. I expect students to cultivate and sustain a reasonable yet regular investment in the course (I personally think that is how you acquire lasting knowledge and skill as a critical thinker).  Accordingly, students are evaluated on the basis of class attendance and participation (25%), five, in-class, quizzes (40%) on major readings for the course, and four short essays (35%), approximately 3 pages each.  All quizzes and essays are promptly returned (i.e. next class period or week in case of essays) and with written comments (in the case of essays)

Religious Studies 2370 Introduction to Comparative Religion

TuTh 9:35AM-10:55AM | Orton Hall 110 | Hugh Urban

Introduction to the academic study of religion through comparison among major traditions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, etc.) and smaller communities. GE Cultures and Ideas and Diversity: Global Studies. Honors version.

Religious Studies 3680 Religion and Law in Comparative Perspective

 TuTh 9:35AM-10:55AM | 140 W 19th 205 | Alexander Kaye, Isaac Weiner

 Comparative, interdisciplinary approach to studying religion and law. Drawing on concrete cases, historical studies, and theoretical literature, the course explores how the relationship between religion and law has been configured differently in different liberal democracies, such as the U.S., France, and Israel, and what this might mean for contemporary debates. Team-taught w/ faculty in History.
Prereq: Not open to students with credit for History 3680. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. Cross-listed in History.

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